Power of Positive Talk

A man was lost while driving through the countryside. As he tried to reach for the map, he accidentally drove off the road into a ditch. Though he wasn’t injured, his car was stuck deep in the mud. So the man walked to a nearby farm to ask for help.

“Warwick can get you out of that ditch,” said the farmer, pointing to an old mule standing in a field. The man looked at the decrepit old mule and looked at the farmer who just stood there repeating, “Yep, old Warwick can do the job.” The man figured he had nothing to lose. The two men and the mule made their way back to the ditch. The farmer hitched the mule to the car. With a snap of the reins, he shouted, “Pull, Fred! Pull, Jack! Pull, Ted! Pull, Warwick!”

And the mule pulled that car right out of the ditch.

The man was amazed. He thanked the farmer, patted the mule, and asked, “Why did you call out all of those names before you called Warwick?”

The farmer grinned and said, “Old Warwick is just about blind. As long as he believes he’s part of a team, he doesn’t mind pulling.”

 

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A Feast for Clothes

Once upon a time in the Iranian city of Shiraz, there lived the famous poet Sheikh Saadi. Like most other poets and philosophers, Sheikh Saadi was not a rich man. He led a very simple life. A rich merchant of Shiraz invited Sheikh Saadi along with a lot of other big businessmen of the town on the occasion of his daughter’s marriage which was to be a grand affair. Sheikh Saadi accepted the invitation and decided to attend.

On the day of the wedding, the host and his family were receiving the guests at the gate. They were ushering all the guests towards the dining hall. All the rich people of the town attended the wedding. They had come out in best of their attires. Sheikh Saadi wore simple clothes which were neither grand nor expensive. He waited in a corner for someone to approach him but no one gave him as much as even a second glance. Even the host did not acknowledge him and looked away. Seeing all this, Sheikh Saadi quietly left the party and went to a shop from where he could hire clothes. There he chose a richly brocaded dress which was embroidered in gold on the margins. He selected a fancy turban and a waist-band to go with it. As he put on the hired dress and looked into the mirror, he found himself a changed person.

With this, Sheikh Saadi entered the dining hall and this time was welcomed with open arms. The host embraced him as he would do to an old friend and complimented him on the clothes he was wearing. On seeing Sheikh Saadi, host said? And here comes our favorite poet. What took you so long, friend? We have been waiting for you for ages! How good of you to have come. The gathering surely would have been incomplete without your gracious presence! Sheikh Saadi did not utter a word and allowed the host to lead him to the dining room where other guests had assembled. Tasty dishes had been laid out on grand carpets. Sheikh Saadi was offered a seat with soft cushions. The food was served in fine crockery and cutlery made out of silver.

The host led Sheikh Saadi by hand and himself served out the chicken soup and the fragrant rice to him. After this, something strange happened. Sheikh Saadi dipped the corner of his waist-coat in the soup and sprinkled some rice on it. Addressing the clothes, he said: This is a feast for you, you should enjoy it.

All the guests were now staring at him in surprise. The host said? Sir, what are doing? How can your clothes eat? And why should they? To this query, Sheikh Saadi very calmly replied: My dear friend, I am indeed surprised with the question coming from you?

Aren’t you the same person who did not even throw a look at me when I came dressed in simple clothes? I can guess that it is my clothes and appearance that matter with you, not my individual worth. Now that I have put on grand clothes, I see a world of difference in reception here. All that I can now say is that this feast is meant for my clothes, not for me.

Pearls of Wisdom

  • Don’t love the Heart that hurts you and don’t hurt the Heart that loves you.
  • Don’t cry over anyone who won’t cry over you.
  • Good friends are hard to find, harder to leave, and impossible to forget.
  • Most people walk in and out of your life, but only friend’s leave footprints in your heart.
  • True friendship “never” ends. Friends are forever.
  • People are lonely because they build walls instead of bridges.
  • If we are incapable of finding peace in ourselves, it is pointless to search elsewhere.
  • The bond that links your true family is not one of blood, but of respect and joy in each other’s life. Rarely do members of one family grow up under the same roof.
  • A change of heart changes everything.
  • Our greatest glory is not in ever falling, but in rising every time we fall.
  • You only live once – but if you work it right, once is enough.
  • One generation plants trees, and the next enjoys the shade.
  • It is difficult to live in the present, ridiculous to live in the future, and impossible to live in the past. Nothing is as far away as one minute ago.

THE PARK BENCH

The park bench was deserted as I sat down to read beneath the long, straggly branches of an old willow tree.  Disillusioned by life with good reason to frown, for the world was intent on dragging me down.

And if that weren’t enough to ruin my day, a young boy out of breath approached me, all tired from play.  He stood right before me with his head tilted down and said with great excitement, “Look what I found!”

In his hand was a flower, and what a pitiful sight, with its petals all worn – not enough rain, or too little light.  Wanting him to take his dead flower and go off to play, I faked a small smile and then shifted away.

But instead of retreating he sat next to my side and placed the flower to his nose and declared with overacted surprise, “It sure smells pretty and it’s beautiful, too. That’s why I picked it; here, it’s for you.”  The weed before me was dying or dead.  Not vibrant of colors: orange, yellow or red.

But I knew I must take it, or he might never leave.  So I reached for the flower, and replied,  “Just what I need.”  But instead of him placing the flower in my hand, he held it mid-air without reason or plan.

It was then that I noticed for the very first time that weed-toting boy could not see: he was blind.

I heard my voice quiver; tears shone in the sun as I thanked him for picking the very best one.  “You’re welcome,”  he smiled, and then ran off to play, unaware of the impact he’d had on my day.

I sat there and wondered how he managed to see a self-pitying person beneath an old willow tree. How did he know of my self-indulged plight? Perhaps from his heart, he’d been blessed with true sight.

Through the eyes of a blind child, at last I could see the problem was not with the world; the problem was me.  And for all of those times I myself had been blind, I vowed to see the beauty in life, and appreciate every second that’s mine.

And then I held that wilted flower up to my nose and breathed in the fragrance of a beautiful rose and smiled as I watched that young boy, another weed in his hand, about to change the life of another unsuspecting individual.

NEED WASHING??

NEED WASHING??

A little girl had been shopping with her Mom in Target. She must have been 6 years old, this beautiful red haired, freckle faced image of innocence. It was pouring outside. The kind of rain that gushes over the top of rain gutters, so much in a hurry to hit the earth it has no time to flow down the spout. We all stood there under the awning and just inside the door of the Target.

We waited, some patiently, others irritated because nature messed up their hurried day. I am always mesmerized by rainfall. I got lost in the sound and sight of the heavens washing away the dirt and dust of the world. Memories of running, splashing so carefree as a child came pouring in as a welcome reprieve from the worries of my day.

The little voice was so sweet as it broke the hypnotic trance we were all caught in ‘Mom let’s run through the rain, she said
‘What?’ Mom asked.

‘Lets run through the rain!’ She repeated

‘No, honey. We’ll wait until it slows down a bit,’ Mom replied.

This young child waited about another minute and repeated: ‘Mom, let’s run through the rain,’

‘We’ll get soaked if we do,’ Mom said.

‘No, we won’t, Mom.. That’s not what you said this morning,’ the young girl said as she tugged at her Mom’s arm.

This morning? When did I say we could run through the rain and not get wet?
‘Don’t you remember? When you were talking to Daddy about his cancer, you said , ‘If God can get us through this, he can get us through anything!’

The entire crowd stopped dead silent. I swear you couldn’t hear anything but the rain. We all stood silently. No one came or left in the next few minutes.
Mom paused and thought for a moment about what she would say. Now some would laugh it off and scold her for being silly. Some might even ignore what was said. But this was a moment of affirmation in a young child’s life. A time when innocent trust can be nurtured so that it will bloom into faith.

‘Honey, you are absolutely right. Let’s run through the rain. If GOD let’s us get wet, well maybe we just needed washing,’ Mom said.

Then off they ran. We all stood watching, smiling and laughing as they darted past the cars and yes, through the puddles. They held their shopping bags over their heads just in case. They got soaked. But they were followed by a few who screamed and laughed like children all the way to their cars.

And yes, I did. I ran. I got wet. I needed washing.

Circumstances or people can take away your material possessions, they can take away your money, and they can take away your health. But no one can ever take away your precious memories…So, don’t forget to make time and take the opportunities to make memories everyday. To everything there is a season and a time to every purpose under heaven.
I HOPE YOU STILL TAKE THE TIME TO RUN THROUGH THE RAIN.

Vision!!!Wonderful…

The train has started moving. It is packed with people of all ages, mostly with the working men and women and young college guys and gals. Near the window, seated a old man with his 30 year old son. As the train moves by, the son is overwhelmed with joy as he was thrilled with the scenery outside.. 
 
” See dad, the scenery of green trees moving away is very beautiful”
 
This behavior from a thirty year old son made the other people feel strange about him. Every one started murmuring something or other about this son. “This guy seems to be a krack..” newly married Anup whispered to his wife. 
 
Suddenly it started raining… Rain drops fell on the travelers through the opened window. The Thirty year old son , filled with  joy ” see dad, how beautiful the rain is .” 
  
Anup’s wife got irritated with the rain drops spoiling her new suit. 
  
Anup ,” cant you see its raining, you old man, if ur son is not feeling well get him soon to a mental asylum..and dont disturb public henceforth”    
                 
 
The old man hesitated first and then in a low tone replied ” we are on the way back from hospital, my son got discharged today morning , he was a blind by birth, last week only he got his vision,  these rain and nature are new to his eyes.. Please forgive us for the inconvenience caused…”
 
 
The things we see may be right from our perspective until we know the truth. But when we know the truth our reaction to that will hurt even us. So try to understand the problem better before taking a harsh action.

It is better to lightup a candle instead of  blamming the darkness.

Bohlool and Thief

It is said that Bohlool lived in a desolate house. Across it was a cobbler’s shop which had a window opening towards the house. Bohlool collected a few dirhams and hid them in the dirt. Whenever the need came, he dug up the dirt and took out the needed coins, and buried the rest back again. As it so happened, one day when he needed some coins, he dug the earth and saw that all of his money had disappeared. He immediately understood that the cobbler, whose window faced his house, had taken the coins.

 

Without making any comment or commotion, Bohlool went and sat by the cobbler to chitchat. Bohlool talked so much that the cobbler became confident and not uneasy. Then Bohlool said, “Beloved friend! Please keep an account for me.”

“You keep talking and I’ll keep adding.”

Bohlool talked about some houses and buildings, and with each he mentioned some coins. Then he said that in the house he now lived in there was buried a certain amount of coins. After that the cobbler added them all up and said that there was a total of 2,000 dinars.

Bohlool thought for a while and said, “O friend! Now I want some advice from you.”

“Okay. Speak.”

“I want to bury all the coins I have at other places in the house that I live in now; what do you think?”

“Very good idea. Bring all the coins you have hidden and bury them in your present house.”

“I agree to this. Now I will go bring all the coins from other places to bury in that house.” Saying this, Bohlool left the cobbler.

The cobbler thought to himself, “I will bury those coins I stole back where they were. When Bohlool brings the other coins, I will find them and take all of them at once.” Thinking this, he returned the stolen coins to their previous place.

A few hours later, Bohlool went to his house and examined the area that he kept his money in and saw that the cobbler had reburied the coins he had stolen. Bohlool took out the coins, thanked Allah, left that house and went to another. The cobbler waited a very long time for Bohlool, but he was not going to be and could not be found. After a while the cobbler finally understood that Bohlool had tricked him, and so had got his money back.

 

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